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Name: J Braciak
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Question:
Is there any way that we can repair the hole in the ozone layer?



Replies:
The best way is simply to let it repair itself. Over time, the natural ozone cycle will replenish the depleted mass to what we think of as "normal" levels, but only if there is no interference by ozone-depleting chemical compounds in the atmosphere. Unfortunately, this poses a serious problem, because due to the way that our atmosphere is layered, it will take around fifty years before the CFC's and other ozone depleting chemicals to actually reach the stratospheric layer where the ozone exists, so even if we stopped their release, fright now, it will be fifty years before the ozone layer can even begin to fix itself.

Some people might propose that we produce it down here (ozone is produced any time you have an electric current running through the air: it is that dry smell you detect when in a room of copying machines, for instance, or during a thunderstorm sometimes.) and ship it up to the stratosphere. Unfortunately, the sheer tonnage of gas that needs to be produced is prohibitively large, and this is impossible -- the hole would fix itself by the time we produced that much and figured out a way to get it pumped to the stratosphere.

Wordsworth



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