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Name: dbias
Status: N/a
Age: N/A
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: Around 1993


Question:
I do not understand why space is not considered a tangible substance, if it has elastic properties.



Replies:
Indeed, several people have looked for the manifestation of this which would be gravitons, the excitations of the gravitational field. So far there is no good evidence that we have seen any after almost 30 years of looking. Either they do not exist, or nothing is happening to produce them near by. The effects you are taking about are very small and would be very difficult to detect near a regular planet. Near a black hole they can be large, we think.

Sam Bowen


A new experiment that is designed to detect even extremely weak gravitational waves has been recently proposed, and may soon be built - this is called LIGO, or laser interferometric gravitational wave observatory (I think). If they exist, this experiment should see them within the next few years.

Arthur Smith


Actually, gravity has not been shown to be an inertial effect. What is usually said is that the effect of gravity cannot be distinguished from the effect of an acceleration from any other source: a force is a force. It is a pretty strong statement, but I do not think it implies all that you are saying it implies.

mooney



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