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Name: Anthony
Status: N/A
Age: N/A
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: Around 1993


Question:
In January 1993, Intel will be coming out with the 586. Is it possible for Intel to come out with a 686 with the microprocessor technology we currently have? What changes have to occur?



Replies:
Well, to review the past advancements:

8086/8088 - 8 bit processor 8 bit bus (8 MHz)
80286 - 16 bit processor 16 bit bus (12 MHz)
80386sx - 32 bit processor 16 bit bus (25 MHz)
80386dx - 32 bit processor 32 bit bus (40 MHz)
80486sx - 32 bit processor 32 bit bus faster speeds (50 MHz)
80486dx - 32 bit processor 32 bit bus (50 MHz) w/ Math Co-processor built in
80586 - ??

It all depends on what the improvements are. There are other improvements in the above, other than bus width, speed, etc. Each processor has been backward compatible, but other functions have been included in each processor like protected mode functions, memory operations, etc.... that have made the processor more multi-user and multi-function compatible. Probably more important, down the line, is not the processor advances, but actual architectural advances. An example is to free the processor from the video tasks and have separate processors for this or multi-processor machines. But, as a chip maker, Intel will continue making new chips. Maybe a 64 bit bus?

Chris Baker



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