Forest Preserve District of Cook County, Illinois
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Mosquitoes
Nature Bulletin No. 19   June 16, 1945
Forest Preserve District of Cook County
Clayton F. Smith, President
Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation

MOSQUITOES
There are many different kinds of mosquitoes. Of the 135 species found in the United States, 32 have been found in Cook County and 22 of these are most common, We do not have the yellow fever mosquito but we do have a few of two species of the Anopheles mosquito which transmits malaria. These are recognized by their spotted wings and the tipped up position of the body when resting -- perpendicular to whatever surface upon which it clings, as if it were standing on its head.

So far, cases of malaria have occurred rarely in Cook County and mosquito abatement has been conducted because mosquitoes are a serious nuisance. Mosquitoes are annoying because of the bites which hurt, swell and itch.

The male mosquito cannot bite. He feeds on the juice of plants. He can be recognized by his bushy, plume-like antennae, or feelers, which serve as ears to hear the song of the females. Each species has its own song, produced by an apparatus at the base of the wings.

The female has slim, simple antennae and is equipped with a high-speed drill for boring through the skin of humans and other animals. Through it she pumps a "poison" to keep blood from coagulating, and through it she sucks that blood which she must have to fill her abdomen in order that her eggs may develop. It is this "poison" which causes the bite to swell and itch.

Next week we will tell you about the different kinds of mosquitoes we have here.


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