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Name: Abhipsa
Status: other
Grade: other
Location: Outside U.S.
Country: India
Date: N/A 


Question:
What is meaning exactly by the homing instinct of birds?



Replies:
There is no exact definition. In the U.S. "homing" usually means the specific ability, often enhanced by training, of domestic pigeons to return to their cotes. A more general "homing instinct" refers to the ability of some birds to return to their home territories after being intentionally or accidentally moved miles away. And even more generally, the word may be used when talking about long range seasonal migration, in which birds may return to the same nesting area several years in a row.

J. Elliott


Abhipsa

When people refer to the "homing instinct of birds" they are referring to the behavior that when some species of birds, most notably pigeons, are taken from their home nest and released some distance away, that the birds tend to return to their home nest. This implies that the birds have a way of navigating from an unknown location to their home base. Scientists have several ideas of how the birds do this and there is some evidence of how they achieve this, but conclusive evidence of how this happens has not been found, yet. Maybe you can find the answer to how the birds can do this.

This is also related to the phenomenon of long range migrating birds such as cranes, geese, ducks, and hummingbirds.

Sincere regards,
Mike Stewart


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