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Name: mindy
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Question:
I have an outdooor pond and I think that our frog has laid eggs outside of the pond on a log (they are large white sacs). Is it possible that they will hatch or can I incubate them in an aquarium? If so how do I do this?


Replies:
Frog eggs usually are little black balls inside clear jelly. As they develop, you see the little tadpoles take form until eventually they hatch.

Frog eggs are quite easy to raise on your own; just put them in water in an aquarium.

I don't know what the large white sacs are.

Richard Barrans


I would suggest that you watch them develop in the pond and not bring them in. They will develop quite rapidly into tadpoles and typically swim as a group for a short time and then disperse into the pond. They are vertebrates with a sensitive nervous system and should not be manipulated without the help and care of a knowledgeable person. They will be much more fun and rewarding to watch develop in their natural state and grow up to be happy frogs...(-:

pf


Frogs will never lay eggs outside of water, its possible for them to lay eggs in water and then have the eggs exposed if water level drops, but it doesn't sound like that's what happened at your pond. Large white sacs might be something from a large insect - I really can't offer much help with what they might be without knowing more about them.

J. Elliott


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