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Name: Elizabeth Seaver
Status: other
Age: 50s
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: 2/21/2004


Question:
No question, but a remark regarding the question about the possibility of a white skunk. Found your site while looking for information about just such a skunk because I saw one in my yard last night. It is not an albino. It has white body fur, a black face & a single black mark on its back. Tail all white. I was viewing it from above (inside stairs), but it looked as if its feet were black. Am curious if it's a variety or aberration. The response to the previous writer leads me to believe it is not a variety, but I will continue my search & also try to get a photo of "mine". I live in Arkansas. Seems I saw another letter from someone who'd seen one in the northeast somewhere. My curiosity is piqued.


Replies:
Partial albinism is not uncommon. I have not heard of that in skunks but would not be surprised if this were the case. I don't know how the genetics work, but I have seen a partial albino robin that was white except for some faint breast color, a partail albino garter snake that had all the markings of a normal garter snake except all the colors were very pale.

J. Elliott


I have seen articles on various animals that were not totally albino. One reference to an alligator that was all white, but the eyes were a normal color. I have seen partial albino crows, common grackles and House sparrows where certain areas of their body feathers were white.

Steve Sample


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