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Name: Sally A.
Status: N/A
Age: 40s
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: 2001281


Question:
How do barred owls spend their winters? Also how do they breathe, eat and excrete wastes as they (barred owls) develop in their egg?


Replies:
Barred owls are permanent residents in most of their range, and are active all winter. Following is an excerpt from an extended article on eggs in The Birder's Handbook, See also any basic ornithology text.

"Some of the details of bird embryology are well known, thanks to intensive research on the domestic chicken. Indeed, generations of biology students have studied the embryology of the chick. The zygote begins development on the surface of the yolk, which is the main energy source for the chick embryo. The "white" (albumen) of the egg provides a sterile, protective, cushioned surrounding for the yolk and the developing embryo. A series of membranes carries out functions for the developing embryo; one (the amnion) cushions it so that no matter how an egg is turned, the embryo always remains "up.""

Copyright 1988 by Paul R. Ehrlich, David S. Dobkin, and Darryl Wheye.

J. Elliott


Believe me, after spending two years chasing a Barred Owl using radio-telemetry in the worst of winters and at night, I can safely say that these birds are active all winter. They are effective hunters.

Steve Sample


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