NEWTON: Temperature Swings
 
Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Office of Science NEWTON's Homepage NEWTON's Homepage
NEWTON, Ask A Scientist!
NEWTON Home Page Visit Our Archives Ask A Question How To Ask A Question Question of the Week NEWTON Teachers Our Expert Scientists Volunteer at NEWTON! Referencing NEWTON Frequently Asked Questions About Ask A Scientist About NEWTON Education At Argonne Temperature Swings

Name: Peter
Status: student
Grade: 6-8
Location: PA
Country: USA
Date: Winter 2012-2013


Question:
Why do certain part of Australia (Sydney for example) experience such drastic and random spikes in heat? For example, one day this summer it was 84, the next day 100, and the following day back down into the low 80's.


Replies:
Hi Peter,

Thanks for the question. I would look at the wind patterns. If the wind blows from the ocean onto land, the wind will cool the land. If there is no wind blowing, then the amount of cooling is less and the temperature will rise. Also, one needs to look at the cloud cover. Clouds usually make the temperatures cooler by blocking some of the sunlight.

I hope this helps. Please let me know if you have any more questions. Thanks Jeff Grell


Peter,

Sydney occupies an interesting place for weather variability.

Just 200 miles west of Sydney and beyond are dry areas of New South Wales and 500 miles northwest and beyond is the very dry interior desert area of Australia. Therefore, depending on the wind direction, you can have very hot and dry air transported from the dry interior (west to northwest wind direction) or much cooler and damper maritime air transported from the north, south, or east.

David R. Cook Meteorologist Atmospheric and Climate Research Program Environmental Science Division Argonne National Laboratory


Click here to return to the Weather Archives

NEWTON is an electronic community for Science, Math, and Computer Science K-12 Educators, sponsored and operated by Argonne National Laboratory's Educational Programs, Andrew Skipor, Ph.D., Head of Educational Programs.

For assistance with NEWTON contact a System Operator (help@newton.dep.anl.gov), or at Argonne's Educational Programs

NEWTON AND ASK A SCIENTIST
Educational Programs
Building 223
9700 S. Cass Ave.
Argonne, Illinois
60439-4845, USA
Update: November 2011
Weclome To Newton

Argonne National Laboratory