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Name: Shyammayi
Status: teacher
Grade: K-2
Country: Mauritius
Date: Summer 2011


Question:
At what time of the day is the temperature hottest? At what time of the day is the temperature coldest?


Replies:
In general, the hottest part of the day is late afternoon. The sun has passed its peak in the sky but still heats the Earth up until very late in the afternoon.

The lowest temperatures are around dawn. Earth has had all night to get rid of the day's heat by radiating it into space. After sunrise, temperatures begin to climb.

This can be changed by local storms, sea breezes or mountain breezes and even monsoon winds.

Hope this helps.

R. W. "Bob" Avakian
Instructor
Arts and Sciences/CRC
Oklahoma State Univ. Inst. of Technology


Shyammayi

Here in the United States, the hottest part of the day is 3:00 PM. The coldest part of the night is between midnight and sunrise.

Sincerest regards,
Mike Stewart


Shyammayi,

In the temperate latitudes of the United States at this time of year the maximum temperature normally occurs around 1400 to 1500 local standard time, in other words 2 to three hours after noon local standard time.

Temperature is normally coolest sometime between sunrise and an hour after sunrise.

David R. Cook
Meteorologist
Climate Research Section
Environmental Science Division
Argonne National Laboratory


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