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Name: Davi C.
Status: student
Age: N/A
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: N/A


Question:
Are there any particles that do not react with gravitons? (that is, not attracted by gravity)



Replies:
Not to my knowledge. Such a particle would have to have zero mass, since the force of gravity is proportional to the product of the masses of the two particles being considered. Even photons, which have no mass, are affected by gravity indirectly. Their trajectory is "bent" by gravity. The theory of relativity predicted this correctly before it was observed experimentally.

Vince Calder


Davi C.,

According to the General Theory of Relativity, everything is affected by gravity. It has been tested and shown that light and neutrinos respond to gravity. On the scale of a galaxy, this can be easy to measure. At the level of individual particles, subatomic forces electromagnetic affects overpower gravity to such a degree that gravity is seldom noticed as part of the experiment. As gravity is usually studied on a large scale, I will use large scale results as the basis for my answer. All particles that have been tested are attracted by gravity.

Dr. Ken Mellendorf
Physics Instructor
Illinois Central College


In simplest terms, because of the curving of space due to gravity, all particles that propagate in space are affected by gravity.

Hope this helps,

Burr Zimmerman
(thanks to PS and LM for being physics gurus)



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