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Name:  Donna
Status:  student
Age:  16
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: 2000-2001


Question:
How does liquid mirror utilizes the concept of parabola?


Replies:
Hello,

If I understand your question correctly, you are referring to mirrors made of liquids. Indeed this can and has been done. For example, if you rotate (around its central axis) a container having a liquid in it at some particular speed, the liquid forms a curved surface indeed the container. If you choose the right liquid, one that reflects, such as mercury, then the rotating liquid can act as a mirror such as focusing an incident beam. I do not recall if the shape is exactly parabolic, but even a spherical one can focus.

If you rotate the liquid and reduce the temperature to freeze the liquid, you could make a solid mirror.

AK

Ali Khounsary, Ph.D.
Advanced Photon Source
Argonne National Laboratory



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