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Name: Diane S.
Status: Student
Age: 30s
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: N/A 


Question:
I am looking for in formation about Micrococcus luterus for a Microbiology report. I have found very little on it. I know that it is normal flora on skin and can be found in soil and water, but that is not enough to do a whole report.

Is there more about this organism that is out there, or do I have all the information I am going to find? I also need some kind of Journal article on it dealing with health or the environment. Please direct me!



Replies:
Micrococcus is a pet organism for microbiology classes because it can be found everywhere, is easy to grow, and is completely harmless. I found more requests on the web from desparate students trying to find relevant information. Unfortunately, harmless bacteria are not 'juicy' enough to be treated with respect on the web. Let's change that! I made a species file on Micrococcus in the Virtual Museum of Bacteria (www.bacteriamuseum.org), go to there directly with

www.bacteriamuseum.org/species/micrococcus.shtml

This will give you a good start. Sorry there is not much more but if I find anything I will keep adding the links to this species file.

Good luck,
Trudy Wassenaar
Curator of the Virtual Museum of Bacteria



First, you need to spell it correctly! Its Micrococcus luteus. "luteus" means yellow. If you do an internet search using the correct spelling, you may find more information.

PF



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