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Name: ken levine
Status: N/A
Age: N/A
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: 1999


Question:
I am trying to find the freezing point of sea water. Can I get some help here? It's my first time trying this feature.


Replies:
The freezing point of seawater depends upon it's salinity, which is the amount of salt that it contains. Open ocean seawater has a salinity of about 35 (no units are used for salinity anymore, although you may see it called o/oo which means parts per thousand or psu, which means practical salinity units. Neither usage is now considered correct). Anyway, fresh water freezes at 0 degrees Celsius and 35 water freezes at about -2 degrees C. The decrease is linear so that water with a salinity of 17 freezes at about -1 degree C.

Stacie



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