Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Office of Science NEWTON's Homepage NEWTON's Homepage
NEWTON, Ask A Scientist!
NEWTON Home Page NEWTON Teachers Visit Our Archives Ask A Question How To Ask A Question Question of the Week Our Expert Scientists Volunteer at NEWTON! Frequently Asked Questions Referencing NEWTON About NEWTON About Ask A Scientist Education At Argonne Foods and Daltons
Name: Lisa
Status: other
Age: 40s
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: 2001


Question:
My dog's vet was telling me that food proteins with low dalton units would be best for my dog to eat at this time. He said there are some companies that make hypoallergenic dog food with "low dalton unit" protein, e.g. 6,000 dalton units. Is there anyway I can learn how many dalton units exist in natural foods, such as, chicken, turkey, beans, tofu, cottage cheese, yogurt, eggs, etc.?


Replies:
Your vet is trying to impress you with his techno-jargon. Without going into the technical details, for all practical purposes the 'dalton' is the unit used to express molecular. For all practical purposes you can same as the molecular weight. So low dalton proteins = low molecular weight proteins. I hope he is not charging extra for dog food low in daltons!!

A dalton is the "official name" of an atomic weight unit. Without going into the technicalities it is synonomous with "molecular weight". Either your vet doesn't know what it means, or he is trying to do a "snow job" on you with "techno-jargon".

Don't pay any extra for "low dalton" dog food. It just means the protein was digested in a vat to partially break down higher molecular weight protein. This is common in the food industry for a variety of reasons, but it does not improve the nutritional value so far as I know.

Vince Calder



Click here to return to the General Topics Archives

NEWTON is an electronic community for Science, Math, and Computer Science K-12 Educators, sponsored and operated by Argonne National Laboratory's Educational Programs, Andrew Skipor, Ph.D., Head of Educational Programs.

For assistance with NEWTON contact a System Operator (help@newton.dep.anl.gov), or at Argonne's Educational Programs

NEWTON AND ASK A SCIENTIST
Educational Programs
Building 360
9700 S. Cass Ave.
Argonne, Illinois
60439-4845, USA
Update: June 2012
Weclome To Newton

Argonne National Laboratory