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Name: Ian
Status: other
Grade: n/a
Country: United Kingdom
Date: Summer 2013


Question:
Why does a car go down on the rear axle when it accelerates from stationary?



Replies:
Hi Rich,

Thanks for the question. Yes, Venetian blinds can reflect some of the heat that would otherwise escape a room. In doing so, the blinds can keep the room warmer than would otherwise be expected. Also, the Venetian blinds provide a buffer region of air between the windows and the room which helps to insulate the room.

I hope this helps. Thanks Jeff Grell


Rich

Yes, blinds can be used to regulate temperature at night. The blinds can be closed to help block wind that might blow in from the outside into the house keeping the house warmer; and The blinds can be closed to help block the leak of inside heat to the outside by blocking the heat loss due to radiation of the heat through the glass.

The blinds can also be closed during the day to block the warming rays of the sun, or they can be opened to allow breezes to pass through into the house.

Sincere regards, Mike Stewart



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