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Name: Jose
Status: Student
Grade: 6-8
Location: SC
Country: United States
Date: Spring 2010


Question:
What are "smart dust"? Are "smart dust" nanotechnology? Is it bigger or smaller?



Replies:
From Wikipedia at:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smartdust

Smartdust is a hypothetical wireless network of tiny microelectromechanical sensors (MEMS), robots, or devices, that can detect (for example) light, temperature, or vibration.

A typical application scenario is scattering a hundred of these sensors around a building or around a hospital to monitor temperature or humidity, track patient movements, or inform of disasters, such as earthquakes. In the military, they can perform as a remote sensor chip to track enemy movements, detect poisonous gas or radioactivity.

SMART Dust is an application of nano technology.

This article shows a picture of a SMART Dust device and explains more about its construction and component parts:

http://robotics.eecs.berkeley.edu/~pister/SmartDust/

See what else you can find by "Googling" "SMART DUST"

Sincere regards,
Mike Stewart


Hi,

Well, this is a new one on me! It seems that "Smart Dust" is a hypothetical concept that would use so-called Nanotechnology. Here is a Wikipedia article that gives an overview of it... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smartdust

Unfortunately, this article is rather technical, but considering the exrtemely technical (and theoretical) nature of this subject, simple explanations are not possible.

Regards,

Bob Wilson



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