Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory Office of Science NEWTON's Homepage NEWTON's Homepage
NEWTON, Ask A Scientist!
NEWTON Home Page NEWTON Teachers Visit Our Archives Ask A Question How To Ask A Question Question of the Week Our Expert Scientists Volunteer at NEWTON! Frequently Asked Questions Referencing NEWTON About NEWTON About Ask A Scientist Education At Argonne Tire and Asphalt Melting
Name: Gary B. P.
Status: Educator
Age: 50s
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: February 2004


Question:
At what temperature does a car tire melt and at what temperature does asphalt melt?



Replies:
Asphalt binder is a handy material in that it flows nicely when it is heated to around 250 degrees F, but is relatively solid at room temperatures. The hot liquid is mixed with pre- heated sand and stone, then delivered to the paving site promptly. The hot mixture is spread and compacted before it cools. When it does cool, it creates a "viscoelastic" material. That is, it acts kind of like a liquid and kind of like a solid depending on the rate of loading. The hotter it is, the more liquid-like it gets.

So, it really does not have a melting point like, say, ice has, but it does soften considerably as the temperature increases. To give you a feel for relative temperature, hot mix is generally delivered at roughly 300 degree F.

Tires are not my specialty, but I understand racing tires operate well over 200 degrees F. I suppose it would be possible for a very hot tire to soften the surface of a pavement under the right conditions.

Andy Johnson



Click here to return to the Engineering Archives

NEWTON is an electronic community for Science, Math, and Computer Science K-12 Educators, sponsored and operated by Argonne National Laboratory's Educational Programs, Andrew Skipor, Ph.D., Head of Educational Programs.

For assistance with NEWTON contact a System Operator (help@newton.dep.anl.gov), or at Argonne's Educational Programs

NEWTON AND ASK A SCIENTIST
Educational Programs
Building 360
9700 S. Cass Ave.
Argonne, Illinois
60439-4845, USA
Update: June 2012
Weclome To Newton

Argonne National Laboratory