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Name: Cassi P.
Status: Student
Age: 16
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: 2001


Question:
Why are car windshields safer than ordinary glass windows?



Replies:
Hi, Cassi

Today, for greater safety, the automotive industry employs the laminated glass which consists of two glasses plates and in-between, a plastic foil made of polyvinil butyral. Occurring an accident, the glass will not "explode", but the small pieces will remain attached over the plastic surface. This is called "laminated glass".

You can also find the temperated glass, that has a great resistance. The heated glass is cooled very fast and reaches a high resistance degree.

Because of the presence of Nickel Sulfide (NiS), some glasses after years of use may suddenly "explode". This is a illness of the glass, but today it is possible to deal with this problem, with a longer period of heating (about 6 hours).

Regards

Alcir Grohmann


Auto glass is tempered, that is, in the manufacture it is cooled in such a way to improve its strength. The glass used in autos is not the same composition as window pane, but I don't know exactly what the differences in composition are. Auto glass is also laminated. The layer between the inner and outer glass is flexible and keeps the two outer layers from shattering. However, a caution, the shards of automotive glass are razor sharp and can cause some nasty cuts.

Vince Calder



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