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Name: Michelle
Status: Educator
Age: 20s
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: N/A


Question:
I am an aide in an elementary classroom. We were looking for a list of magnetic metals. Could you help us out?



Replies:
It all depends on how you look at it. Without getting in great detail the basic magnetic elements are Iron, Cobalt and Nickel and their alloys. Then there are the new ceramic materials which exhibit magnetic capabilities.

Michael Baldwin


Dear Michelle--I do not have a reference book handy from which to extract a list of magnetic metals, but here is a simple way for you to find a list yourself (and which you can use for other general reference questions that may come up in your teaching duties).

Since you have access to the Net and a computer, go to the Net and type in www.lycos.com When the Lycos search engine screen comes up, go the general search window at the bottom of the screen and enter the words "magnetic metals" (without the quotes), then hit the GO button. You should come up with more than you thought possible on your topic.

I tried a search, and even though I forgot your exact subject area and incorrectly used the words "magnetic materials", I got a list back of reference sources that will blow your socks off. On that list alone were some good sources for magnetic metals. Hope this helps and good luck on your teaching duties (my wife is a former teacher); you have chosen a difficult field but it can be personally rewarding at times when you manage to connect with a kid and his/her eyes light up and they understand something for the first time.

John S.



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