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Name: Ronald
Status: Other
Age: 50s
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: N/A


Question:
What grade of steel is corrosion resistant besides stainless steel?



Replies:
Depending on your definitions of "grade" of steel and what you mean by "corrosion", Cor Ten steel is considered corrosion resistant even though it works on the principle of producing a surface layer of oxide material (a type of rust) that protects the underlying steel from further corrosion. It is used a lot on buildings and bridges. You can also consult a materials handbook in a good reference library or contact the American Institutute of Steel Construction (AISC) [I believe they are in Pittsburgh, but not sure] for additional information on corrosion resistant steels. Another item is galvanized steel, but I do not know if you are looking at an application involving large structural steel members or small metal items. Since you confined your answer to steel, I presume you are not looking at titanium (used in golf clubs, etc.) or anything in the zirconium family (like zircaloy--used in making nuclear fuel rods) for its corrosion resistant properties. These metals are expensive.

I am not a "metals" guy and this is my limited knowledge at present. Hope it helps a little.

John S.


Galvanized, galvannealed, and aluminized are all types of processed steel that would be corrosion resistant. Steel grades with greater than 8% alloying metals would be pretty much corrosion resistant. Looking through my handbook, I did not see any carbon steels with less than 8% alloying metals. All stainless grades have much higher than 8% alloy metals. Tool steel grades are high alloy. Superalloy grades are even higher (usually not even based on iron) and are designed for use above 540 degrees C (1000 F)!

Joe Schultz



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