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Name: brent
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Question:
Just curious, I bought a house in massachusetts three years ago. There is a very interesting tree that I have been trying to research since that time. The tree is app. 100 feet tall, almost cedar looking bark (greyish red). The tree looses it's fern like leaves in the winter. The closest resemblence I can find is The Dawn Redwood. Is it possible for this to be accurate and this tall. I know it is a rare tree brought to this country from china.



Replies:
Dear Brent,

Yes, it is likely a Metasequoia:

http://bluehen.ags.udel.edu/gopher-data2/.conifers/.descriptions/m_glyptostr oboides.html
http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/trees/11105
http://www.msue.msu.edu/msue/imp/modzz/00000951.html
http://www.msue.msu.edu/msue/imp/mod03/01700610.html

Sincerely,

Anthony R. Brach


Sounds possibly like a baldcypress to me, though this would be north of the natural range. (I have planted one here in Pennsylvania in an area a bit far north also of the natural range). You may have seen photos of the tree in the wet areas of the south with "knees" which rise out of the water. Since the tree sounds mature, you should be able to locate 'cones' from the tree. This would lead you to a certain identification. Good luck!

Thanks for using NEWTON!

Dr. Rupnik



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