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Name: catherine m myers
Status: N/A
Age: N/A
Location: N/A
Country: N/A
Date: 1993 - 1999


Question:
How would you teach your field to K-6 students?


Replies:
Dear Catherine-

The first question is, "Why would I teach my field to K-6 students?" If teaching astronomy means giving up time from teaching children how to read, write, and think clearly (using mathematics as appropriate), then I certainly wouldn't do it.

Having said that, I know that I want children to learn something in school about what the world around them is like. So you teach some geography, you show the students a globe, as a representation of the world, and you teach them that the earth revolves around the sun. So somewhere in all of this is an idea of th e solar system, and of distant stars. When these ideas are introduced, you will want to connect them with the night sky, so you will want to be able to tell the students what to look for when they go outdoors at night. The magazine "Sky and Telescope" ca n be a great help to you if looking at the night sky is a new idea.

Discussion of the night sky must lead you to discussion of constellations, and I would be sorry if everyone doesn't learn to identify the big and little dipper, and the north star. But discussion of constellations, and their names, connects you with ancient history and mythology.

My goodness, I wouldn't know how to fit all of this into six short years! Hope this helps.

J Lu



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